K-Patents Applications in Food and Beverage Industry

2.01.00 Alcohol Distillation

       2.01.01 Rum

2.02.00 Wine

       2.02.01 Wine Grape Processing
       2.02.02 Wine Interface Detection

2.03.00 Beer Brewing Process

2.04.00 Juice and Soft Drinks

       2.04.01 Juice Evaporation
       2.04.02 Juice Blending
       2.04.03 Alcoholic and Carbonated Soft Drink Blending

2.05.00 Dairy

2.05.01 Whey Separation Process
2.05.02 Milk Evaporation and Drying
2.05.03 Infant Formula Production by Wet-Mixing Process
2.05.04 Sweetened Condensed Milk Production

2.06.00 Coffee and Tea

       2.06.01 Tea Extract Reverse Osmosis (RO) Membrane Filtration

2.07.00 Egg Process
2.08.00 Sugar Dissolving
2.09.00 Jam Cooking
2.10.00 Tobacco Process
2.11.00 Tomato Paste Evaporation

       2.11.01 Tomato Ketchup and Sauces from Tomato Concentrate Plant

2.12.00 Soybean Oil Production
2.13.00 Food and Beverage Interface Detection
2.14.00 Chewing Gum Coating
2.15.00 Donuts Sugar Coating
2.16.00 Rice Pudding
2.17.00 Yeast Extract

2.18.00 Processed Meat Products

2.18.01 Brining of Co-Extruded Synthetic Sausage Casings 



2.01.01 Rum

Rum is a distilled beverage made from sugar cane by-products, such as molasses and sugar cane juice, by using fermentation and distillation. The distillate, a clear liquid, is usually aged in oak barrels or in similar devices.
Ref. 2.01.01 Rum (pdf)

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2.02.01 Wine Grape Processing

Modern harvesting and winery techniques have had an impact on the wine production methods. Grapes are harvested and transported to gathering sites. After weighing and separation from the stalks, the grapes are ground to produce, which is termed as grape must. If the wine producer receives grapes from various vineyards, each particular crop supplied is processed separately. The price paid for each separate crop depends on the quantity and the quality of grapes, delivered by the grape producers.
Ref. 2.02.01 Wine Grape Processing (pdf)

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2.02.02 Wine Interface Detection:

Many processing plants use the same filling station for a range of different products. For example, wine factories run wines from different barrels in the same station. High-speed in-line filling machine operations can be improved by utilizing real-time Refractive Index measurement technology. Automated monitoring and control of the CIP cleaning process allows wines to be switched without the need for a shutdown. This way, an increased productivity is achieved without compromising the end product.
Ref. 2.02.02 Wine Interface Detection (pdf)

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2.03.00 Beer Brewing Process:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.03.00 Beer Brewing Process (pdf)

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2.04.01 Juice Evaporation:

Fruit juice concentration requires the partial removal of water content so that all the solid components such as fruit sugars, minerals and vitamins are left in a more concentrated solution. The purpose of concentration is to ensure longer storage life and easier transportation.
Ref. 2.04.01 Juice Evaporation (pdf)

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2.04.02 Juice Blending:

Juice is prepared through mechanical squeezing of fresh fruits or vegetables. Juice always has 100 % fruit content. Nectar is also made from fruit or vegetables but with added sugar and it may have a juice content of 25-99 %. Still drinks have a juice content of 0-24 %, which can come from fruit, vegetable or other flavourings. A highly automated process is essential for achieving precise in-line juice blending. This is necessary because instabilities in the juice concentrate and water flows, caused by variations in tank contents and pumping rates, lead to fluctuations in the concentrate/water ratio. These fluctuations are difficult to control when using traditional blending methods.
Ref. 2.04.02 Juice Blending (pdf)

2.04.03 Alcoholic and Carbonated Soft Drink Blending

Alcoholic and soft drink mix, e.g. Chuhai (an alcoholic drink originating from Japan) is prepared by mixing carbonated water flavored for example with grapefruit juice, and alcoholic beverage, such as whiskey, vodka or shōchū (a Japanese distilled beverage).
Quality assurance using in-line process refractometer for fast and reliable product identification and set-point detection is important. Combining refractometer with automatic controls can minimize transmix of products, reduce waste, reduce the filling times, decrease safety risks, reduce sampling and minimize operator errors. A highly automated process is essential for achieving precise in-line alcoholic soft drink mix.
Ref. 2.04.03 Alcoholic and Carbonated Soft Drink Blending (pdf)

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2.05.01 Whey Separation Process:

Whey is a liquid residue of cheese and casein production, which contains large amounts of food protein. Whey comprises 80-90 % of the total volume of milk entering the process. It also contains about 50 % of the nutrients of the milk: protein, lactose, vitamins and minerals. Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is processed by ultrafiltration (UF). Also, reverse osmosis (RO) or diafiltration are used. UF is the most widely used process of membrane filtration (fractionation) in the dairy industry. The principle of these processes is that a membrane restricts the passage of particles over a certain size. For example, in UF large particles like fats and proteins are retained (retentate), while small particles, like salts and sugars, pass through the membrane (permeate).
Ref. 2.05.01 Whey Separation Process (PDF)

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2.05.02 Milk Evaporation and Drying:

Evaporation is one of the oldest methods for preserving milk. In this operation, water is removed from the milk to obtain a concentrated dairy product. Depending on the process, the evaporated milk may be the desired end-product, or evaporation may just be a prior step to further processing, for example, for the production of sweetened condensed milk or powdered milk.
Ref. 2.05.02 Milk Evaporation and Spray Drying (PDF)
En Español: Leche Evaporada o Concentrada (PDF)

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2.05.03 Infant Formula Production by Wet-Mixing Process:

Baby milk, or infant formula, is a substitute for breast milk. It is available as either a dried powder, or as a ready-to-use canned or bottled liquid. Infant formula can be manufactured by a wet-mixing process where all ingredients are handled in liquid form, a dry-blend process where ingredients are blended as powders, or a combination of these processes.
Ref. 2.05.03 Infant Formula Production by Wet-Mixing Process (PDF)
En Español: Fórmula Infantil (PDF)

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2.05.04 Sweetened Condensed Milk Production:

Sweetened condensed milk is a product obtained simply by evaporating milk to decrease the water content and adding a sweetener. The sweetener can be sucrose, dextrose or any other natural sugar.
Ref. 2.05.04 Production of Sweetened Condensed Milk (PDF)
En Español: Leche Condensada Azucarada (PDF)

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2.06.00 Coffee and Tea:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.06.00 Coffee and Tea (pdf)

2.06.01 Tea Extract Reverse Osmosis (RO) Membrane Filtration:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.06.01 Tea Extract Reverse Osmosis (RO) Membrane Filtration (pdf)

2.07.00 Egg Process:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.07.00 Egg Process (pdf)

2.08.00 Sugar Dissolving:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.08.00 Sugar Dissolving (pdf)

2.09.00 Jam Cooking:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.09.00 Jam Cooking (pdf)

2.10.00 Tobacco Process:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.10.00 Tobacco Process (pdf)

2.11.00 Tomato Paste Evaporation:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.11.00 Tomato Paste Evaporation (pdf)

2.11.01 Tomato Ketchup and Sauces from Tomato Concentrate Plant:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.11.01 Tomato Ketchup and Sauces from Tomato Concentrate Plant (pdf)

2.12.00 Soybean Oil Production:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.12.00 Soybean Oil Production (pdf)

2.13.00 Food and Beverage Interface Detection:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.13.00 Food and Beverage Interface Detection (pdf)

2.14.00 Chewing Gum Coating:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.14.00 Chewing Gum Coating (pdf)

2.15.00 Donuts Sugar Coating:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.15.00 Donuts Sugar Coating (pdf)

2.16.00 Rice Pudding:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.16.00 Rice Pudding (pdf)

2.17.00 Yeast Extract:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.17.00 Yeast Extract (pdf)

2.18.01 Brining of Co-Extruded Synthetic Sausage Casings:

Overview of process control
Ref. 2.18.01 Brining of Co-Extruded Sausage Casings (pdf)

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